Bachelor Of Science in Business Administration

ATTENTION: The BSBA Program will launch Spring quarter 2018 or Fall quarter 2018 ! We will begin accepting applicants in Winter 2017.

“Success in business requires dealing with
human beings, which is to say conscious beings.
Great leadership is conscious leadership.
A conscious business promotes mindfulness for all of its stakeholders.”
~Fred Kofman, Conscious Business

Combining Psychology and Business Administration, Sofia University is leading the innovative understanding of human capital in business ventures. The online and onsite BSBA program at Sofia University will prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and tools in:

  • Communication: Communicating effectively in a business environment.
  • Critical Thinking: Using critical thinking to make business decisions.
  • Business Fundamentals: Applying knowledge of fundamental principles in all business disciplines and deal with business problems from an integrative perspective.
  • Business Ethics: Demonstrating awareness of the ethical and legal aspects of the business environment.
  • Decision Making: Applying decision-support tools to business decision making.

The BSBA requires a total of 180 units comprising lower division, upper division and concentration courses. Students will also take a selection of Liberal Arts and Psychology elective courses to balance out their general psychology and business backgrounds. All students are required to complete a capstone project course in their last 1-3 quarters of the program. All course in the major need to be taken with a grade of “C” or better for each course.

The Sofia University Difference: With an awareness of the core values of Humanists, graduates will explore the social responsibility of oneself and of business, and have an understanding of the entrepreneurial spirit needed to address the ever-changing world.

 

Acting Program Chair: David Bergner, Ph.D. in Management Science, Stanford University

Educational Background

  • Ph.D. in Management Science, Stanford University
  • M.S. in Engineering Economic Systems, Stanford University
  • Graduate Sociology, San Jose State University
  • B.S in Applied Sciences, University of Louisville

Current Projects

Data Science based Decision Making

Biography:

David is an energetic organizational leader, accomplished technologist, and passionate teacher with a strong commitment to his students. He retired from NASA with 30 years of diverse experience in science, engineering, technology research and development, program formulation and management, executive management, and organizational development. He teaches courses in Quantitative Methods, Operations Management, and Applied Decision Sciences. His decision science approach emphasizes dialogue processes for effective inquiry, balanced with contemplation and reflection, to clarify values, surface assumptions, and develop an appropriate frame. With this foundation, mathematical modeling and data science can generate insights by focusing inquiry on essential variables and facilitating collaborative deep reasoning. David’s research interests include frame analysis, computational dialogue models, organizational and team factors in data mining, and the emergence of online decision support communities.

 

Faculty Members of Business School

BSBA-General-Education

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration General Education Basic Skills Requirements

Our bachelor’s degree program General Education requirements follow the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) that is a general education pattern that fulfills all lower-division general education requirements. Students may take their general education requirements at Sofia or they may complete the requirements at a community college and then transfer the completed requirements to Sofia.

The IGETC pattern requires completion of a minimum of 37 semester/49 quarter

units of lower division work with a C grade or better in each course. Sofia’s General Education requirements are as follows:

  • Area 1 - English Communication (12 units)
  • Area 2 - Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning (4 units)
  • Area 3 - Arts and Humanities (17 units)
  • Area 4 - Social and Behavior Sciences (8 units)
  • Area 5 - Physical and Biological Sciences (8 units)

AREA 1: English Communication (12 units)

3 courses required – ENG 100, 101 and 102.

ENG 100 – Written Communication (4 units) IGETC:
A-English Composition This course introduces the techniques of collegiate English composition with emphasis on clear and effective writing and analytical reading. Students will write a series of essays including a documented research paper. Because this is a collegiate level writing course, students must enroll with strong grammatical competence. This introductory class in the composition series focuses on critical reading, rhetorical analysis, and argumentation.
CLEP Option: College Composition

ENG 101 – Oral Communication (4 units) IGETC:
1C-Oral Communication This course introduces theory, practice, and evaluation of oral communication. The course emphasis is on ethical responsibility, careful selection and development of ideas, and logical organization of expository, argumentative, and persuasive speaking. This is a basic course in speech designed to develop each student's ability to communicate effectively in his or her academic, business, and social life. The major emphasis is on the preparation and delivery of formal speeches, but many areas of the communication process are explored.

ENG 102 – Critical Thinking (4 units)
This is an introductory course in the principles of good reasoning. Critical Thinking is the process by which we develop and support our beliefs, and evaluate the strength of arguments made by others in real-life situations. Students will practice some of the most central and important skills of critical thinking, and focus on applying those strategies to understanding current issues, belief systems, and ethical positions. Students will analyze media, the current political environment, and their own beliefs and moral inclinations. Students will learn to appraise information and influences, discuss controversial topics intelligently, and construct well-reasoned arguments on a variety of topics. The course will focus on group discussion and written analysis. This is a writing course. Students will be expected to produce and share rough drafts before turning in their final version.

Area 2 - Mathematical Concepts & Quantitative Reasoning (4 units)

1 course required – MTH 100, 101 or 102 Either MTH 100 or MTH 101 is needed to satisfy the General Education Requirement for Quantitative Skills. MTH 100 is required for Business and Liberal Arts majors. Either MTH 100 or MTH 101 is required for Psychology majors.

MTH 100 College Algebra (4 units)
College Algebra provides an introduction to the important world of mathematical functions and their applications. Functions describe quantitative change and are found in many fields of study, such as business, economics, and social studies. The following topics will be covered in the course: definition of a function; the domain and range; linear, exponential and logarithmic, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions and their graphs; operations on, transformations and applications of these functions; composition of functions and inverse functions; introduction to sequences and series. This course should prove useful in most courses in economics, finance, production, and statistics/quantitative analysis.
CLEP Option: College Algebra.

MTH 101 Finite Math (4 units)
This course studies finite math from a modeling perspective; modeling real world situations with linear equations; modeling with proportionality; a study of linear equations, their solutions and applications; fitting data best with a straight line; modeling with systems of linear equations; various ways of solving such systems; the concept of optimizing under constraints, as exemplified by linear programming; financial modeling, including compound interest, the present value of money, and annuities; modeling with probability.

MTH 102 Liberal Arts Mathematics (4 units)
This course will cover an examination of important concepts of mathematics and of mathematics as a tool for decision-making. Topics and applications may include aspects of the history of mathematics, problem solving, counting methods, elementary number theory, sets, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, Platonic solids, topology and logic.

Area 3 - Arts and Humanities (17 units)

5 courses required – AIK 100, (ART 100 or MUS 100), PHI 244, CRE 100 and Foreign Language Elective (3-5 units).

AIK 100 Introduction to Aikido (1 unit)
Students will learn about Aikido through a set of physical exercises designed to demonstrate some of the main principles of Aikido. Students will practice a set of standard Aikido drills designed to help them learn how to move in a more efficient manner, how to fall safely and how to interact with their training partner. There will be a mix of individual and paired exercises with ample opportunity for students to explore each exercise and the ideas behind it. The course instructor will explain all exercises. Senior Aikido practitioners will be available to help students and to ensure that they perform the exercises correctly and in good form.

ART 100 Art Appreciation (4 units)
This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the greatest achievements of world painting, sculpture and architecture, with works that have inspired people of all cultures throughout time. Art Appreciation will encourage students to question the nature of art and its relevance to daily life; it will introduce students to the elements and principles of design, focusing their attention through both projects and research.

MUS 100 Music Appreciation (4 units)
This course is designed to help the student acquire informed listening skills which promote the development of curiosity about, an enthusiasm for and the enjoyment of many types of music. This course provides an approach to perceptive listening and an introduction to musical elements, forms, and style periods. The discussion of composers’ lives, individual styles and representative works aim not merely to impact facts, but stimulate curiosity and enthusiasm. The class material will cover from the Renaissance to the present. This course will relate the music of an era to historical events and to the art and literature of the time period discussed.

PHI 244 Introduction to Ethics (4 units)
This course examines the concept of morality and values, representative ethical theories and includes their applications to contemporary social and moral issues.

CRE 100 Creative Expression (4 units)
This course allows students to explore the creative process and the connection it has with cognitive, psychological, emotional, bodily/kinesthetic, aesthetic, and social development.

Area 4 - Social and Behavior Sciences (8 units)

2 courses required – HUM 101, HUM 102 or SOC 100 and PSY 100

HUM 101 Cultural Studies (4 units)
This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. This course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in ENG 100.

HUM 102 Human Growth and Development (4 units)
This course covers an overview of human growth and development (infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging). Students will gain an understanding of the major theories and research related to the broad categories of physical development, cognitive development and social development. Student will also explore how to apply this knowledge to life situations.
CLEP Option: Human Growth and Development.

SOC 100 Social Sciences and History (4 units)
This course will cover a wide range of topics from the social sciences and history disciplines. Topics to be covered include United States history, Western civilization, world history, government and political science, geography, sociology, economics, psychology and anthropology.
CLEP Option: Social Sciences and History

PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology (4 units)
This course is an introductory survey of the subject matter, fields, and methods of psychology. This course will address theoretical perspectives as well as findings from experimental research. The basic topics for inquiry include consciousness, perception, learning, cognition, motivation, emotion, development, personality, and social psychology. Applications to industry, organizations, and management of human resources will also be considered.
CLEP Option: Introductory Psychology.

Area 5 - Physical and Biological Sciences (8 units) Students are required to complete one biological and one physical science course with a paired lab class, choosing from BIO 101/103 or BIO 102/104 and PSC 100/101 or CHE 100/101

BIO 101 Human Biology (3 units)
This course provides an inquiry into the form and function of the human organism. Organ systems are studied, and recent scientific and medical advances are investigated. Required laboratories involve exercises in blood pressure, sense perception, digestion and respirometry.

BIO 103 Human Biology Lab (1 unit)
This is the laboratory course and exercises to accompany the Human Biology class. Concurrent enrollment with BIO 101 is required.

BIO 102 General Biology (3 units)
This course is a general introduction to principles and concepts of biology through selected topics at the cellular, organism, and population levels of organization. Students will be exposed to the many thought provoking contemporary advances in biology that have applications in medicine, agriculture, environment, pharmaceuticals and many other industries. CLEP Option: Biology

BIO 104 General Biology Lab (1 unit)
This is the laboratory course and exercises to accompany the General Biology class. Concurrent enrollment with BIO 102 is required.CLEP Option: Biology

PSC 100 Introduction to Physical Science (3 units)
This is a general education physical science course comprising the principles of astronomy, geology, physics and related sciences. Thought provoking contemporary topics from the Big Bang to the evolution of the solar system and the earth will be studied.

PSC 101 Introduction to Physical Science Lab (1 unit)
This is the laboratory course and exercises to accompany the Introduction to Physical Science class. Concurrent enrollment with PSC 100 is required.

CHE 100 General Chemistry (3 units)
This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including chemical stoichiometry; the properties of gases, liquids, and solids; solutions; chemical equilibria; atomic and molecular structure; an introduction to thermodynamics; reaction kinetics; and a discussion of the chemical properties of selected elements. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis, and synthesis.
CLEP Option: Chemistry.

CHE 101 General Chemistry Lab (1 unit)
This is the laboratory course and exercises to accompany the General Chemistry class. Concurrent enrollment with CHE 100 is required.
CLEP Option: Chemistry.

Curriculum

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

The B.S. degree requires a total of 180 units. The Business Administration major requires three sets of courses: (I) lower division core courses, (II) upper division core courses, and (III) courses to fulfill concentration option requirements. Students will also take a selection of Liberal Arts and Psychology elective courses to balance out their general psychology and business backgrounds. All students are required to complete a capstone project course in their last 1-3 quarters of the program. All course in the major need to be taken with a grade of “C” or better for each course. Students are expected to complete 45 units of course work per year. They must complete a minimum of 45 units at Sofia in order to receive a bachelor’s degree from us.

Degree Requirements

Lower (42) / Upper Division (45) 87
Concentration Courses 18
Liberal Arts / Psychology Elective Courses Up to 6 units of internship credit may be substituted for elective classes. 17
General Education Requirements 49
Senior Capstone Project 9
Total Credits Required for Degree 180 units

Program Learning Outcomes (PLO)

The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree at Sofia University will prepare students to enter a wide range of careers in the private and public sectors, or to enter graduate programs. The degree develops broadly educated individuals who are able to analyze and solve business-related problems in rapidly changing environments.

Learning Outcomes

1. Communication: Students will be able to communicate effectively in a business environment.

  • Students will demonstrate oral communication skills during presentations.
  • Students will demonstrate written communication skills by producing quality business documents.

2. Critical Thinking: Students will be able to use critical thinking to make business decisions.

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to identify key issues.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to find, read and evaluate information sources.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to use technology to gather and analyze data.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to solve problems using appropriate quantitative and qualitative skills.
  • Students will acknowledge and consider each other’s opinions when participating in group decisions.

3. Business Fundamentals: Students will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental principles in all business disciplines and deal with business problems from an integrative perspective.

  • Students will demonstrate understanding of concepts and basic terminology from all business disciplines.
  • Students will understand how one functional area impacts another and apply an interdisciplinary approach when solving business problems.

4. Business Ethics: Students will demonstrate awareness of the ethical and legal aspects of the business environment.

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to recognize key aspects of ethical issues.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to distinguish between legal and ethical issues.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of ethical responsibilities
in both academic and business environments.

5. Decision Making: Students will apply decision-support tools to business decision-making.

  • Students will practice problem analysis and decision-making, both individually and as part of teams and groups, using vehicles such as written/oral communication, technology, problem and case analysis, integrated modules, and consulting opportunities.

Business Administration Program Requirements

The following color-coded courses are also part of Sofia’s Bachelor’s Completion program in Liberal Arts and Psychology. Students from both majors take these classes.

Blue – BAC-Psychology Concentration

Maroon – BAC-Business Concentration

Lower Division (14 classes, 42 units)

  • BSB 1010 – Principles of Macroeconomics (3 units)
  • BSB 1011 – Principles of Microeconomics (3 units)
  • BAC 2060 – Financial Accounting (3 units)
  • BSB 1012 – Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 units)
  • BAC 2040 – Business Statistics (3 units)
  • BSB 1013 – Information Systems and Technology (3 units)
  • BAC 3000 – Foundations of Transpersonal Psychology (3 units)
  • BAC 3600 – Introduction to Psychology and History (3 units)
  • BAC 2080 – Marketing Management (3 units)
  • BSB 1014– Human Resource Management (3 units)
  • ELP1002 – Academic Listening and Speaking (3 units)
  • BSB 1015 – Entrepreneurial Leadership (3 units)
  • BAC 4100 – Creative Expression (3 units)
  • BAC 2010 – Critical Hermeneutic Thinking for Leaders and Managers (3 units)

Upper Division (15 classes, 45 units)

  • BSB 2010 – International Economics (3 units)
  • BSB 2011 – FinancialManagement (3 units)
  • BAC 3630 – Business Ethics (3 units)
  • BAC 3250 – Statistics & Statistical Reasoning (3 units)
  • BAC 2030 – Organizational Theory (3 units)
  • BSB 2012 – Advanced Principles of Marketing (3 units)
  • BSB 2013 – Spirituality in the Workplace (3 units)
  • BSB 2014 – Fundamentals of Strategic Management (3 units)
  • BAC 3290 – Digital Literacy (3 units)
  • BAC 3140 – The Writer’s Perspective: Oral Presentation (3 units)
  • BSB 2015 – Business Law (3 units)
  • BAC 3073 – Social and Cultural Perspectives (3 units)
  • BAC 3210 – Research Methods (3 units)
  • BSB 2016 – Team Leader ship Skills (3 units)
  • BAC 3012 – Quantitative Modeling for Business Decisions (3 units)

Business Administration Concentration Courses

All students must complete a minimum of 36 credits of concentration or elective business courses. A concentration/elective course can be used to fulfill the requirements of more than one concentration. Students pick one concentration, complete 18 units of concentration and 18 units of other business electives, or select two concentrations and complete 18 units for each concentration selected. Optionally, students don’t need to select a concentration. They can simply take 36 units of business electives that may or may not fall into any concentration.

MANAGEMENT PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION - 6 courses required

  • BSB 3010 – Educational Psychology (3 units)
  • BAC 3730 – Social and Cultural Psychology (3 units)
  • BAC 3300 – Social Bases of Behavior (3 units)
  • BAC 3073 – Social and Cultural Perspectives (3 units)
  • BAC 3061 – Personality Theory (3 units)
  • BAC 3510 – Methods of Inquiry (3 units)

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION CONCENTRATION - 6 courses required

  • BAC 3110 – The Writer’s Perspective (3 units)
  • BAC 3200 – Critical Thinking: How to read like a writer (3 units)
  • BAC 3130 – The Writer’s Perspective: Creative Writing (3 units)
  • BAC 3260 – Transpersonal Theory & Research (3 units)
  • BSB 3011 – Group Processes (3 units)
  • BSB 3012 – Organizational Communication (3 units)

INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION - 6 courses required

  • BSB 3013 – Database Management Systems (3 units)
  • BSB 3014 – Systems Analysis and Design (3 units)
  • BSB 3015 – Information Networking and Security (3 units)
  • BSB 3016 - Problem Solving and Risk Management (3 units)
  • BSB 3017 - Information Systems Planning and Policy (3 units)
  • BSB 3012 – Organizational Communication (3 units)

BSB 4000 – Senior Capstone Project (9 units)
As part of the Sofia University experience, every senior completes a capstone project. Working individually or in teams, students work on a problem with a real- world component, sometimes teaming with a local industry or governmental sponsor. Capstone project ideas can come from the students themselves, from faculty advisors, or from sponsors. The capstone project allows students opportunity to use the knowledge and skills they learned at Sofia to address a real-world problem, and receive valuable hands-on experience. Students are required to produce a final project report, both in written form and in the form of an oral presentation to the faculty, their student peers, and the public.
No CLEP Option.

Course Descriptions - Lower Division (14 classes, 42 units)

BSB 1010 – Principles of Macroeconomics (3 units)
This aspect of economics deals with principles of economics that apply to an economy as a whole, particularly the general price level, output and income, and interrelations among sectors of the economy. Emphasis is placed on the determinants of aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and on monetary and fiscal policy tools that can be used to achieve particular policy objectives. Within this context, students are expected to understand basic economic concepts such as scarcity and comparative advantage and measurement concepts such as gross domestic product, consumption, investment, unemployment and inflation. Students are also expected to demonstrate knowledge of the institutional structure of the Federal Reserve Bank and the monetary policy tools it uses to stabilize economic fluctuations and promote long-term economic growth, as well as the tools of fiscal policy and their impacts on income, employment, price level, deficits, and interest rate. Basic understanding of foreign exchange markets, balance of payments, and effects of currency appreciation and depreciation on a country's imports and exports will also be covered.
CLEP Option: Principles of Macroeconomics.

BSB 1011 – Principles of Microeconomics (3 units)
This course covers an introduction to microeconomics, including economic principles that apply to the behavioral analysis of individual consumers and businesses. Students will apply analytical techniques to hypothetical as well as real- world situations and to analyze and evaluate economic decisions. Students will gain an understanding of how free markets work and allocate resources efficiently, how individual consumers make economic decisions to maximize utility, and how individual firms make decisions to maximize profits. Students will learn how to identify the characteristics of the different market structures and analyze the behavior of firms in terms of price and output decisions. Students will also be able to evaluate the outcome in each market structure with respect to economic efficiency, identify cases in which private markets fail to allocate resources efficiently, and explain how government intervention fixes or fails to fix the resource allocation problem. Students will also be exposed to the determination of wages and other input prices in factor markets, and be able to analyze and evaluate the distribution of income.
CLEP Option: Principles of Microeconomics.

BAC 2060 – Financial Accounting (3 units)
The course topics will cover topics including, familiarity with accounting concepts and terminology, preparation, use, and analysis of accounting data and financial reports issued for both internal and external purposes, and application of accounting techniques to simple problem situations involving computations. Student will also receive an understanding of the rationale for generally accepted accounting principles and procedures.
CLEP Option: Financial Accounting.

BSB 1012 – Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 units)
This course covers the concepts, theory and practice of the cost-control function of management. Students will learn what information is needed within an organization; where to obtain this information; and how managers can use this information to plan, control and make decisions. Topics include cost behavior and forecasting, capital budgeting, activity-based costing and management, costs of quality and productivity improvement programs, cost-volume analysis, tactical decision making and transfer pricing.
CLEP Option: Principles of Accounting.

BAC 2040 – Business Statistics (3 units)
This course covers data summaries and descriptive statistics; introduction to a statistical computer package; Probability: distributions, expectation, variance, covariance, portfolios, central limit theorem; statistical inference of univariate data; Statistical inference for bivariate data: inference for intrinsically linear simple regression models. This course will have a business focus, but is not inappropriate for other students in the college.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 1013 – Information Systems and Technology (3 units)
This course helps you to understand what IT components are available and how you can utilize appropriate IT applications for success. You will learn the terminology used in the field of IT and how IT principles can apply to a business. The course stresses the competitive advantage of using IT and the return on investment that you can see. It focuses on the basic principles of Information Technology: hardware and software components, database technology, telecommunications and networking, e-commerce and e-business, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Decision Support Systems (DSS), Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Expert Systems (ES), systems development and implementation, and the ethical and societal issues involved in IT.
CLEP Option: Information Systems and Computer Applications

BAC 3000 – Foundations of Transpersonal Psychology (3 units)
This course introduces theories and concepts of transpersonal psychology. Students will learn about the origins of transpersonal psychology, the contributors to the field, the research that is being conducted, and the applications of transpersonal studies to personal growth, counseling, education, society, and human welfare.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3600 – Introduction to Psychology and History (3 units)
Students will learn and demonstrate knowledge of terminology, principles, and theory of psychology. Students will also explore the history of these concepts. They will also learn how to comprehend, evaluate, and analyze problem situations. Students will apply knowledge to new situations.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 2080 – Marketing Management (3 units)
This class covers Basic Marketing, Introduction to Marketing, Fundamentals of Marketing, Marketing, or Marketing Principles. Students will focus on the role of marketing in society and within a firm, understanding consumer and organizational markets, marketing strategy planning, the marketing mix, marketing institutions, and other selected topics, such as international marketing, ethics, marketing research, services and not-for-profit marketing. Students will also gain basic knowledge of the economic/demographic, social/cultural, political/legal, and technological trends that are important to marketing.
CLEP Option: Principles of Marketing.

BSB 1014 – Human Resource Management (3 units)
This course will cover an introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.
No CLEP Option.

ELP 1002 – Academic Listening and Speaking (3 units)
This course concentrates on preparing students for the listening and speaking needed in the university environment. This course reviews American English in terms of intonation, rhythm, stress, and emphasis.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 1015 – Entrepreneurial Leadership (3 units)
This course offers an introduction to the creative and innovative managerial practices of successful entrepreneurship. This course reviews the significant economic and social contributions entrepreneurs provide to society, the intense lifestyle commitment, and the skills necessary for entrepreneurial success. Students will also be provided an overview of the entrepreneurial process.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 4100 – Creative Expression (3 units)
This course will explain the importance for nurturing creativity people. It will focus on and explain why it is crucial that business people connect and develop relationships with each of their associates and clients. This course will also explore general foundation concepts related to creative expression.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 2010 – Critical Hermeneutic Thinking for Leaders and Managers (3 units) This course examines theories and applications of leadership and business ethics. The course reviews traditional leadership and ethical theories, discusses organizational leadership-ethics models from individual and systems perspective. The course analyzes specific common ethical problems encountered in business at the individual, manager, and organization levels. In addition, students will be introduced to critical hermeneutic participatory research conversations as a qualitative research approach for problem analysis and decision-making in the leadership-ethics field.
No CLEP Option.

Course Descriptions - Upper Division (15 classes, 45 units)

All Lower Division courses must be completed as a prerequisite to all Upper Division courses.

BSB 2010 – International Economics (3 units)
This course discusses the reasons trade happens and why some countries engage in policies that restrict trade; and how trade encourages (physical and financial) international resource movements (investments) and produces growth and development. Also discussed is whether a country’s balance of payment is positive or negative and how it affects exchange rates. Finally, this course describes how automatic (price/income) adjustments in open-economies take place under flexible and fixed exchange rate regimes in order to maintain internal (unemployment / inflation) and external (balance of payments and exchange rates) balance.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 2011 – Financial Management (3 units)
This course discusses concepts in accounting and finance that will enable students to (1) analyze and understand financial statements depicting the operation and performance of a firm, (2) use tools and techniques to calculate the value of assets and, thus, make decisions regarding optimal investment, capital budgeting, financing mix and capital structure, and (3) prepare short-term cash-flow budgets and forecasts involving sales and working-capital accounts. Course activities include a research project.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3630 – Business Ethics (3 units)
Business ethics is the moral analysis of business activity and practices. In business ethics, we consider business actions and decisions in the light of moral principles and values, and ask whether ethical motives in business activity would make business better and more successful. Among the considerations included in this course is the question about whether any ethical values are already implied in business and market activity, or whether introducing ethics into business will cause fundamental changes to business. In addition, students will assess how business does and should affect our individual and social lives, and ask what role business and its values (could) play in our society as a whole.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3250 – Statistics & Statistical Reasoning (3 units)
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and logic of statistical reasoning and gives the students introductory-level practical ability to choose, generate, and properly interpret appropriate descriptive and inferential methods. In addition, the course helps students gain an appreciation for the diverse applications of statistics and its relevance to their lives and fields of study. No CLEP Option.

BAC 2030 – Organizational Theory (3 units)
This course will improve students’ interpersonal and team-working skills. It will help students to understand organizational behavior issues, with a special emphasis on assessing leadership competencies and changing corporate cultures. Topics include analyses of leading companies and direct application of material to individual work settings.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 2012 – Advanced Principles of Marketing (3 units)
Advanced Marketing builds on the principles and concepts taught in Marketing Management. Students assume a managerial perspective in applying economic principles in marketing, analyzing operations needs, examining distribution and financial alternatives, managing marketing information, pricing products and services, developing product/service planning strategies, promoting products and services, purchasing, and professional sales. This course also deals with global marketing in that students analyze marketing strategies employed in the U.S. versus those employed in other countries.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 2013 – Spirituality in the Workplace (3 units)
This course provides a basic overview of the field of spirituality in the workplace and how to cultivate practices that support and transform our personal/individual place(s) of work. We describe workplace as any place or space in which the individual makes his or her professional contribution. Throughout this course, students will engage in readings and various activities exploring how the utilization and practice of Spirit can transform both the workplace and the individual(s) within the workplace. These explorations will lead to a scholarly paper that bridges relevant theory with practice.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 2014 – Fundamentals of Strategic Management (3 units)
This course discusses the theory and process of building up and realizing approaches for getting competitive advantage in domestic and international business environments. Students will gain knowledge in the fields of strategic management and global business. In the development of the study of this hypothetical work, students will also consider a diversity of empirical methods used to study the local and global competitive strategy practice. CLEP Option: Principles of Management.

BAC 3290 – Digital Literacy (3 units)
This course prepares students to be fully literate/functional in the world of digital resources. Students will learn to find, assess, apply and effectively strategize uses of digital resources. They will learn to manage information overload, file management, citation management and personal information infrastructure along with analytic and communication skills pertaining to digital resources.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3140 – The Writer’s Perspective: Oral Presentation (3 units)
This course introduces students to the functions and modes of oral presentation, as well as many practical strategies with which to execute it. It requires students to plan, prepare, practice and perform various types of public messages that provide them with invaluable experience in developing ideas thoroughly and communicating them effectively. Emphasis is given to help students execute informative and persuasive presentations that are clearly focused, well organized, substantially supported, effectively worded, and confidently delivered. The aim is to help students develop their abilities to express their thoughts, beliefs and experiences in an intelligent and affecting manner, as well as to help them gain confidence in themselves as they do so. Students will also engage in the critique and analysis of the messages of others. Attention is given to interpersonal & group communication class experiences as well.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 2015 – Business Law (3 units)
Business law reviews issues with the legal problems confronting businesses such as court procedures, contracts and property law. Other topics include court systems, litigation, and alternative dispute resolution; constitutional and administrative law; tort law and, product liability; contract law and, agency law; business organizations; and government regulation of businesses including antitrust law, employment law, and securities regulation.
CLEP Option: Introductory Business Law.

BAC 3073 – Social and Cultural Perspectives (3 units)
This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior in groups and the social forces that shape society and to the social construction of reality. Special attention is given to the application of sociological ideas and analysis. Topics include, but are not limited to, methods of research, major sociological theory, culture, socialization, group dynamics and interaction, deviance and crime; social stratification; race, ethnicity, and gender; the family; social institutions; population and environment; and social change.
CLEP Option: Introductory Sociology.

BAC 3210 – Research Methods (3 units)
This course will provide an opportunity for students to establish or advance their understanding of research through critical exploration of research language, ethics, and approaches. The course introduces the language of research, ethical principles and challenges, and the elements of the research process within quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches. Students will use these theoretical underpinnings to begin to critically review literature relevant to their field or interests and determine how research findings are useful in informing their understanding of their environment (work, social, local, global).
No CLEP Option.

BSB 2016 – Team Leadership Skills (3 units)
This course will provide students with an overview of leadership and team building skills. The focus is on the traits of successful leaders and the dos and don’ts for building effective teams. Students will also become familiar with how leadership practices can affect key management aspects of a project, such as scope, time, cost, human resources, stakeholders and communications.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3012 – Quantitative Modeling for Business Decisions (3 units)
This course provides the student with the concepts, methods and tools for the application of logical and quantitative analysis to business decision making and problem solving. It familiarizes the student with a wide range of software and other classical and contemporary resources related to decision and problem analysis, including basics of logic and decision making, principles of optimization, probabilistic distributions, linear programming, simplex, queuing and transportation problems, break even analysis, inventory management, forecasting and simulation. The course highlights the benefits as well as the limits of quantitative analysis in a real-world context.
No CLEP Option.

Course Descriptions – Management Psychology Concentration

BSB 3010 –Educational Psychology (3 units)
This course will provide knowledge and comprehension of basic facts, concepts, and principles related to educational psychology. Students will learn the association of ideas with given theoretical positions. They will also gain an awareness of important influences on learning and instruction. Students will gain a familiarity with research and statistical concepts and procedures as well. The goal is for students to gain the ability to apply various concepts and theories as they apply to particular teaching situations and problems.
CLEP Option: Introduction to Educational Psychology.

BAC 3730 – Social and Cultural Psychology (3 units)
This course is an orientation to Professional ethics in psychology and counseling. Students will have the opportunity to review ethical codes from the counseling profession along with exploring the relationship between the practitioner’s sense of self and human value, ethical and spiritual mandates, relationship with and responsibilities to other providers. Advocacy processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that impede access, equality, and success for clients will be examined.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3300 – Social Bases of Behavior (3 units)
This course is an introduction to the field of Social Psychology, its key concepts, and its applications. Major topics to be covered include: How social, cultural, relational, and situational factors shape and influence individual psyches, perspectives, and behavior. The sociocultural constructed and mediated nature of our perceptions of reality. Important concepts and theories in Social Psychology, including social constructionism, schemata theory, social influence, attribution theory, social identity theory, cognitive dissonance, cognitive bias, and “the power of the situation.” Social Psychology research, past and present, including groundbreaking and controversial studies like Asch conformity experiments and the Stanford prison experiment.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3073 – Social and Cultural Perspectives (3 units)
Students will engage a broad survey of the current and historical literature of ecological literacy and movements. Students will develop a project based in the concepts of sustainability and systems theory.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3061 – Personality Theory (3 units)
This class lays the foundation for personality theory, psychological inquiry, and the understanding of psychological concepts. This course surveys eastern, indigenous, ecological, and western perspectives on being human and emphasizes an integration of personality theories and transpersonal practices as preparation for identifying one's own beliefs about human development.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3510 – Methods of Inquiry (3 units)
This course is an introduction to approaches, methods and technologies of basic research. The E- Portfolio and its requirements will be introduced and students will complete one element of the Portfolio (the Biographical Statement) at the Intensive.
No CLEP Option.

Course Descriptions – Business Communication Concentration

BAC 3110 – The Writer’s Perspective (3 units)
This course offers students the opportunity to engage multiple themes through the lens of distinct literary and scholarly genres. Through reading, discussion and textual analysis students will learn relative strengths and weaknesses different types of writing to convey information effectively, and why that is so.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3200 – Critical Thinking: How to read like a writer (3 units)
This course offers students the opportunity to engage multiple themes through the lens of distinct literary and scholarly genres. Through reading, discussion and textual analysis students will learn relative strengths and weaknesses different types of writing to convey information effectively, and why that is so.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3130 – The Writer’s Perspective: Creative Writing (3 units)
This course covers a multi-genre introduction to the craft of creative writing. In the context of a variety of genres, students will examine literary conventions as well as the writing techniques and tools essential to effective writing and editing.
No CLEP Option.

BAC 3260 – Transpersonal Theory & Research (3 units)
This course provides an overview of research designs and transpersonal methodological approaches commonly encountered in research. The course provides a systematic approach to the scientific method as it is used in research in organizations with human participants, including critical reviews of literature, ethics, hypothesis testing, reliability and validity, sampling, research design, observational and self-report methods, and selected issues in data analysis.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 3011 – Group Processes (3 units)
This course will explore the techniques used in small groups and large-group interventions, including reviews of the current research, legal, and ethical issues associated with paraprofessional and professional practice in business and psychology.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 3012 – Organizational Communication (3 units)
The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
No CLEP Option.

Course Descriptions – Information & Technology Management Concentration

BSB 3013 – Database Management Systems (3 units)
Database is the powerful tool for data creation, storage and management and is the core technology to almost any business, scientific research and social activities today. This course introduces the basic concepts for the design and development of relational databases and database management. Topics include relational data model and entity-relationship diagram, rational database design principles, data administration, Structured Query Language (SQL), transactions, database implementation, database management issues, such as concurrency control, data security, and integrity. A database management system software package is used to implement a database in the course project. The student will have a solid understanding on relational database system and its applications upon completion of the course.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 3014 – Systems Analysis and Design (3 units)
This course introduces established and evolving methodologies for the analysis, design, and development of an information system. Emphasis is placed on system characteristics, managing projects, prototyping, CASE/OOM tools, and systems development life cycle phases. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze a problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 3015 – Information Networking and Security (3 units)
Data communications field for the business student including the introductory topics of hardware, software, protocols, channels, modems, local area networks, wide area networks and various applications. Students will gain hands-on experience with current popular data communication systems. Security concepts including policies, access control and network assessment are covered.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 3016 - Problem Solving and Risk Management (3 units)
Systematic approaches to problem solving and decision-making. Students will learn behavioral and organizational decision making processes relating to their roles as both manager and information systems designer. Topics include recognizing and defining the problem, troubleshooting, individual and group decision-making, risk management, incident handling, threat assessment, allocating resources, and implementation strategies.
No CLEP Option.

BSB 3017 - Information Systems Planning and Policy (3 units)
This course will provide advanced study of information systems planning and policy formation for top management. The class covers strategic use of information technology in organizations; the theory, methods and practices of enterprise systems planning; and design and implementation of information systems policy. Policy issues surrounding project management, information classification, IT audit, and legal issues related to privacy and security will also be covered.

BSB 3012 – Organizational Communication (3 units)
The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
No CLEP Option.